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Potential medicine for Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease is a catastrophic diagnosis that invariably leads to death. A study at Linköping University now singles out a new candidate for a medicine: a molecule that can get through the blood-brain barrier and reduce the toxicity in the substance associated with the disease.




Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences criticises researcher for misconduct

The board of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences today reached a decision on the report of misconduct concerning a researcher at the faculty. The decision was based on the faculty’s assessment, including the investigation conducted by three external experts. The investigation criticises firstly a lack of compliance with regulations relating to laboratory work, and secondly a publication. The faculty’s decision is therefore to criticise the researcher for misconduct.

New stroke treatment reduces suffering

If injuries after a stroke can be limited through new treatments, there is a possibility of reducing human suffering and also saving resources, as research into health care analysis at Linköping University shows.

Unique method tested on alcohol addiction

For the first time in the world’s history, people with alcohol addiction will be treated with magnetic stimulation of structures deep within the brain. The study is led by Professor Markus Heilig, who has recently been recruited to LiU from a top post in the United States.

Resin may provide medicine against epilepsy

Sticky resin from conifers contains substances that could relieve or cure epilepsy. Researchers at Linköping University have synthesized and tested 71 substances known as resin acids, of which twelve are prime candidates for new medicines.

Lecture Online: Nanoparticles around us and why size matters

The use of nanomaterials create concerns regarding their toxicity and possible impact on our health and environment. Online lecture with Susana Cristobal, Professor of Biomedicine.

Young people meet buyers of sex via the net

For young people not doing well in life, the likelihood is great that the internet becomes an area for sexual contacts. For some, that knowledge leads them to start selling sex.

Sara Liin

‘Tuned-up’ fatty acids - cure for cardiac arrhythmia?

In a new study, LiU researchers show how fatty acid variants can open an ion channel that is very important for the heart, thereby reducing the risk of arrhythmia.

Nursing programme very popular among applicants

The number of applicants to the spring term programme at the Faculty of Health Sciences is significantly higher than in the same period last year. The nursing programme has received 55% more applications than last spring.


Page manager: susanne.b.karlsson@liu.se
Last updated: 2014-07-02