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Two new Wallenberg Fellows at LiU

LiU has two new Wallenberg Academy Fellows, who will get the opportunity to develop their research ideas. The challenges they’re taking on relate to relapses in acute leukemia, a form of cancer, and materials that can help us create new organs using 3D printers.

Twenty-nine new Wallenberg Academy Fellows have been appointed, of which two at Linköping University. The programme, financed by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, provides promising young researchers five years of funding. They also get to take part in a leadership programme.

Daniel Aili, Wallenberg Acadey FellowFor people requiring a transplant, the demand for healthy organs is greater than the supply. Consequently, medical researchers dream of being able to create new organs from stem cells. Daniel Aili, senior lecturer at Linköping University (LiU), is working on the development of a material that can support cells that will form new organs. An important goal is to make it possible to create new organs using a 3D printer.

A 3D printer can, layer by layer, position all the specialised cells in exactly the right place. But cells are sensitive. One problem is that most cells die when forced through a 3D printer’s nozzle. Daniel Aili is developing a material, a cell-friendly hydrogel, that can protect the cells during this process. The material will support the cells in their new environment. It will also be adaptable, so that it contains substances that encourage the cells to develop into the desired tissue.

Sasan Zandi, Wallenberg Academy FellowSasan Zandi is currently at the University of Toronto, but will work as a Wallenberg Academy Fellow at LiU. He will investigate why it is so difficult to cure relapses of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a form of cancer. Even if the treatment is initially successful, many people with AML suffer relapses. It was previously believed that this was because the previous cancer cells had returned. However new research shows that the cells causing the relapse may be significantly different from the first cancer cells.

Sasan Zandi will investigate whether relapses in AML are due to new cancer cells having developed from the cells that made up the pre-stage of the cancer. One important aim is also to develop treatments that kill these cells, possibly preventing AML and life-threatening relapses.

The researchers who are appointed as Wallenberg Academy Fellows have been nominated by various Swedish universities. Assessors at the five scientific academies evaluate the candidates, and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation makes the final selection.

“More than half of this year’s Academy Fellows have doctoral degrees from abroad. This indicates that the programme is very attractive, outside Sweden as well. We’re also happy that in this highly competitive environment, close to 40 per cent of successful applicants are women,” said the foundation’s executive director, Göran Sandberg.

Pictures of Daniel Aili and Sasan Zandi by Markus Narcotic © Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation/The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences


Thu Dec 01 09:59:31 CET 2016




Helene Hellmark Knutsson

SEK 3 billion extra to research

Benefit to society, increased gender equality and initiatives linked to societal challenges are in focus in the research bill presented by the Swedish government. The bill provides extra money to LiU for research into 5G and digitalisation.

Electronic paper

SEK 20 million to energy research

Five researchers at LiU have each been awarded SEK 1 million per year for four years in research grants from a joint initiative by the Swedish Energy Agency and the Swedish Research Council in energy-oriented basic research.

Christmas caps

Christmas concerts, carols and choirs

Christmas without concerts? That’s simply not an option for LiU’s choirs. This year, seven ensembles will perform at not less than 18 concerts.

Human petting a chicken

Measuring stress in chicken’s blood

How are animals in food production affected by stressful experiences early in life? Per Jensen wants to find out whether it is possible to see the traces of stress much later. He has been awarded SEK 8 million by Formas, the Swedish research council for sustainable development, to study the stress reactions of chickens in detail.

Timber truck not carrying a load

Large research grant for greener timber trucks

With the aid of a supercomputer, a wind tunnel and a research grant of SEK 5.7 million, the 2,000 timber trucks in Sweden are to achieve lower fuel consumption, becoming in this way a little bit greener.

Rat bones in a jar

Sooner on your feet after hip fracture

An already available drug can help patients get back on their feet more rapidly after a hip fracture, according to an international study published in the Journal of Bone Joint Surgery. The results suggest that treatment with the drug accelerates the healing process in broken bones.

Illustration of antibody

Major grants for biosensor research

Biosensors with extremely small gold particles known as “nanoparticles” are helping researchers to improve the development of biological drugs. They are also playing a role in the diagnosis of disease. Daniel Aili at LiU is the principal investigator for a project that has been awarded SEK 5 million from the Swedish Research Council and Vinnova’s joint initiative in biological drugs.

Jan-Åke Larsson

Help researchers in The BIG Bell Test

In a large number of identical experiments conducted at nine locations worldwide, the ability of people to act unpredictably will be used in an experiment in quantum physics. Linköping University is the Swedish node of the experiment, scheduled for 30 November 2016.

Sustainable building

SEK 20 million for sustainable development

Eight LiU researchers will each receive approx. SEK 3 million for research relating to sustainable development. One of the research projects will answer the question: Which is better and cheaper: renovation or demolition and new construction.

Disco ball

Discourse and dance

Research and revels, can they be combined? Indeed they can, according to the organisers of the g16 conference. Not only researchers from all round the world, but also Linköping residents are invited to several events in association with the conference, 23-25 November.

Trump causes concern at Marrakech climate change meeting

The election of the new US president coincided with the UN Climate Change Conference in Marrakech, and the result led to reactions. Donald Trump has not presented himself as a fan of climate change agreements.

Whiplash injury

Whiplash – evaluating interventions

Whiplash injury often leads to long-term pain and disability for many people. Around 30,000 people suffer whiplash injury each year in Sweden, half of whom subsequently experience persistent pain. The symptoms often increase during activity and when working with the arms at shoulder height.

Traffic planning

LiU researchers make space for drones

Reports of unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) that force airports to close are becoming increasingly frequent. Researchers at LiU are now starting to develop models for the efficient management of the increasing numbers of drones.

mathias fridahl

Trump and bureaucracy challenge when the Paris Agreement is discussed in Marrakesh

The Paris Agreement came into force much sooner than many people believed. But it’s not just the various parties to the agreement who are preparing for the first meeting after it was reached.

textbooks

“Us and Them” attitudes in school textbooks

The textbooks in secondary schools in Sweden are not racist. Some textbooks, however, divide people into groups, and some fail to discuss Sweden’s national minorities.

Alumni of the Year celebration

A refugee expert and a hearing researcher are Alumni of the Year

This year’s Alumni of the Year at Linköping University are Suad Ali, expert on Sweden’s refugee quota, and Thomas Lunner, one of the researchers behind the world’s first digital hearing aid.

Turquoise cellulose

Shedding light on cellulose quality

Researchers from LiU have developed in collaboration with others a molecule that changes colour when it binds to different forms of cellulose. The researchers demonstrate how the molecule can be used to make rapid, optical measurements of cellulose quality.

Researchers working

Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection

The HIV virus increases the potency of the tuberculosis bacterium (Mtb) by affecting a central function of the immune system. The discovery helps to explain why infection with HIV greatly increases the risk that infection by Mtb will progress to active tuberculosis.

Child crying

Violence and abuse against children with disabilities

Children with disabilities are subject more frequently to violence. Despite criticism from the UN, Sweden lacks a comprehensive picture of the situation for these children. Two LiU researchers have surveyed our knowledge in this area.

Circular economy in Almedalen

SEK 10 million to research in the circular economy

LiU researchers have won two major research projects within the field of design and construction for a world in which we husband, recycle and reuse natural resources. Both will be carried out in close collaboration with industrial partners.

The mineral elpasolite

Artificial intelligence reveals new materials

Artificial intelligence is helping researchers in their search for new useful materials. Researchers at LiU have discovered 90 previously unknown materials, which they predict can be created in the laboratory.

Old woman hugging a therapeutic robot

Technology and aging – where to?

Sensors that are swallowed or woven into clothes. These are two of a wide range of technical solutions that may be reality for the elderly and the personnel who care for them. Because technology will play an increasing role – this was the conclusion of the Aging & Society conference.

Researchers in the lab

Intestinal diversity protects against asthma

Children who develop asthma or allergies have an altered immune response to intestinal bacteria in the mucous membranes even as infants. This new study also suggests that the mother’s immune system plays a role in the development of asthma and allergies in children.

Feng Gao

Efficient organic solar cells with very low driving force

Researchers at LiU, together with Chinese and American colleagues, have developed organic solar cells with a significantly lower driving force and faster charge separation than previous cells. The results have been published in Nature Energy.

Baby by the computer

SEK 11 million for research in health and welfare

Four research teams at LiU have been awarded a total of SEK 11 million from the FORTE research council. These include a team working on a project looking at what mental ill-health means to young people, and another analysing how easy people can obtain assisted conception.

Malaz Katie, Nora Hajar and Avin Rozbayani

Students teach Swedish to those newly arrived

“Language is the key to success in Sweden,” says Semir Abdulkader.
He is studying at LiU to become a nurse, and one of several students with non-Swedish backgrounds who are helping newly arrived young people to learn Swedish.


Features

redress for neglect

Shadows of peopleJohanna Sköld from Child Studies at Linköping University co-organised an international workshop where researchers compared various models of compensation for institutional neglect and abuse.

 

tomorrow's nobel laureates?

Pupils from a primary school in Skäggetorp Anna Lindström and Monika Lopez of the Department of Culture and Communication applied earlier this year for funding for an initiative in an issue relating to refugees. The funding was granted, and the “Tomorrow’s Nobel laureates” project was born. 

 

Alumni of the year 1

Suad Ali, porträtt

Suad Ali, expert on Sweden’s refugee quota, works tirelessly for refugees worldwide. For her dedication she has been chosen as one of Linköping University’s two Alumni of the Year.

 

Alumni of the Year 2

Thomas-Lunner-i-studioThomas Lunner’s research has given improved hearing to millions of people with impaired hearing. He has been chosen as one of this year’s Alumni of the Year.

 

 

Discussed mathematics

Jonas Bergman Ärlebäck vid tavlan i klassrummet på Skäggetorpsskolan. Foto från skolans fb.What’s zero to the power of zero? Jonas Bergman Ärlebäck, senior lecturer at LiU’s Department of Mathematics, rushed over to a local primary school to discuss mathematics. 

 

conference on climate change denial

Picture of globeMartin Hultman, who works with environmental history and the history of ideas, is organising the world’s first conference on climate change denial.

 

lessons for life in guatemala

Sabina Nordén and Sofie Folkesson building a school in Guatemala.Engineering students Sabina Nordén and Sofie Folkesson took a year off university to renovate a school in Guatemala – using PET bottles.

 

café success

Dörte Bernhard and Tove Mattson at World café. Dörte Bernhard and Tove Mattsson from the Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning got it just right when they organised a World Café for 60 students of teaching and 30 students taking the accelerated course for those newly arrived in Sweden.

 

when åke became ann-christine

Ann-Christine Ruuth. Photo: Melinda Reyes Hiltunen“Why do we laugh at men in dresses?” This was one of the questions that Ann-Christine Ruuth asked the audience at a packed lecture that was part of Linköping’s Rainbow Week.

 

full of life at kalas

Kalas 2016Thousands of students are making a pilgrimage to the Saab Arena for “Kalas”, Sweden’s largest event for new students.

 

acting in a tv hit

Simon Alzén in Narcos. Photo: privateHis exchange year in South America turned out to be quite different from what LiU student Simon Alzén had expected. He can be seen this autumn in the American hit series “Narcos”.

 

farewell liu

Farewell Ceremony 2016, audience

Excitement about the future – and a celebration right now. That was the mood at this year’s Farewell Ceremony for Linköping University’s international master’s students.

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In brief

Three days of Julia Kristeva

The famous psychoanalyst, linguist, philosopher and feminist Julia Kristeva has her own dedicated conference. This year it will be held in Stockholm from 13 to 15 October, with researchers from a number of countries coming together to discuss her work and ideas. Co-organisers include LiU’s Department of Culture and Communication.

International conference on aging and the elderly

The global population is becoming increasingly older, while the experiences of the elderly are becoming increasingly diverse. This will be discussed at an international conference on aging to be held in Norrköping, 6-7 October 2016.

Malmstens at London Design Fair

Graduates of the Furniture Design Programme at Carl Malmsten Furniture Studies will attend the London Design Fair, 22-25 September. The graduates will show innovative lighting for the private and public sectors. The pieces were first presented at this year’s Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair. In conjunction with the Stockholm fair, the graduates received invitations to participate in London.

Conference on education and gender

Researchers from around the world will gather in Linköping from 15 to 17 June to discuss gender, nationalism and intersectionality, with a focus on schools and education.
“We want to shed particular light on Sweden and Scandinavia. We believe we have so much equality, and this belief is part of our identity. But it can also lead to superiority over people from other countries. That ‘we’ are so good and ‘they’ don’t know what we’re talking about,” says Katarina Eriksson Barajas, professor of education at Linköping University.

Bus. Photo: Göran Billeson

Cheaper bus

As of 1 September, everyone studying at least half-time will be able to buy tickets from Östgötatrafiken at student prices. The student discount applies to 30-day central and suburban routes. The student association Stuff were the ones pushing the issue of student discounts on public transportation.




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Last updated: Thu Dec 01 13:59:42 CET 2016